Dr. Saad Saad, a Pediatric Surgeon and a Family Man

Dr. Saad Saad is not only a great U. S. Board Certified Pediatric Surgeon who has accomplished much in his extensive career, but he is also a family man with several children whom he adores greatly. Because of his love and devotion to his children, Dr. Saad Saad quit his job as the Saudi Royal Family’s pediatric surgeon after only having worked in Saudi Arabia for several years to return to America so that his children could receive an American education.

In America, Dr. Saad Saad found employment at the K Hovnanian Children Hospital as the children hospital’s co-director and surgeon-in-chief. Dr. Saad Saad’s job duties at the children hospital include treated and operating on the hapless children found themselves swallow with a foreign object stuck in either their trachea or esophagus and experiencing trouble breathing, trouble swallowing, and wheezing.

Dr. Saad Saad was born a Palestinian in the 1940’s at a time of great agitation in the Middle East, but because of the rise of Israel found himself rendered a Palestinian refugee living in the neighboring country of Kuwait.

Dr. Saad Saad is a medical graduate of the Cairo University in Egypt, where he excelled in his medical studies finishing the medical school ranked second in his class. Learn more about Dr. Saad Saad: https://doctor.webmd.com/doctor/saad-saad-md-3d5f8ce5-a764-4c86-b201-e50ec51cd7f2-overview and https://www.vitals.com/doctors/Dr_Saad_Saad.html

Dr. Saad Saad was also the Saudi Royal Family’s personal pediatric surgeon for several years in the 1980s before family obligations forced him into returning to the States, where his finished his brilliant career as a U. S. Board Certified Pediatric Surgeon at the K Hovnanian Children Hospital.

When a child puts a foreign object in his/her mouth, most of the time the object exit the body natural in a day or so. Occasionally, the foreign object gets stuck causing blockage either in the trachea or esophagus, which leads to trouble breathing, trouble swallowing, and wheezing. If the freakish does happen and attempts made to remove the stuck object ends in frustration to the intervener, take the kid to the emergency room forthrightly.

Dr. Saad prescribes 3 absolutes: one, never scoop the foreign object out of the child’s body as this very often pushes the foreign further down causing further blockage rather than its removal from the child’s body; two, don’t let children under the age of 2 have any hot dogs; and three, don’t let children under the age of 7 have any peanuts.